Travel Back in Time: A Trip to the Lopez Museum & Library

Whenever I go to museums I can’t help but be reminded that I am but a part of something big- that I’m just a link in an enormous, spectacular chain of events. This was what I felt the whole time when I visited Lopez museum and Library last week.

I missed my parents and wished they were with me as I was sort of “transported back in time.”  I remember my lolo Pulo and his stories surviving the World War II.  I suddenly wanted to talk to my grandmother, Lola Ising about her stories on Japanese colonization.  She was a young lady then and can vividly recall how her family and friends protected themselves in order to survive.

I appreciated my subjects in History and Kasaysayan decades ago and noted that I have so much to learn about my country’s rich past and heritage.

The Lopez Museum and Library opened its very first exhibition for the 2015 on February 6.  The exhibition “Propaganda” commemorates the 70th anniversary of the end of World War II.  What made this exhibit special was the fact that they partnered with Samsung Electronics Phils. to combine traditional media with digital content which provides a unique interactive museum experience.

Manuel Rey Isip, The Fighting Filipinos, Ink on paper (poster), 1943

The exhibit pays tribute to these various artists who truly make us proud as their works are lauded here and abroad.  Don M. Salubayba, 2009 CCP Thirteen Artists Awardee and one of the most promising artists of his generation; Santiago Bose, recipient of various prestigious awards and who has had solo exhibitions here and abroad; Negros Occidental-based artist Nunelucio Alvarado, known for works of art that depict faces, plight, and struggles of the Negros-based Sakadas, and marginalized sectors; 2012 Thirteen Artists awardee Joey Cobcobo and Gawad Urian awardee film-maker Alvin Yapan. (Just a side note: Most of them graduated from UP College of Fine Arts.)

 

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Art pieces bring life to walls – Propaganda 2015

 

Nunelucio Alvarado, Detail of Wala Title, Mixed media installation, 2015

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J. Elizalde Navarro, A Flying Machine for Icarus, 1984

 

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Wala Title, Nonelucio Alvarado, 2014, Mixed media on paper

Enriching the exhibit are works by 18th century masters Juan Luna and Félix Resurrección Hidalgo, along with those of national artists Fernando Amorsolo, Jose Joya, Cesar Legaspi, Vicente Manansala, and J. Elizalde Navarro from the permanent collection.

I fell in love with Juan Luna’s works.  This one is my favorite:  Espana Y Filipinas, 1886.

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With a favorite masterpiece by Juan Luna

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Augmented reality / Ultraviolet image as seen through a Samsung tablet

Featured in the exhibit are World War II posters, election-related archival materials, LVN movies, (which my parents love)  still photographs, a collection of rare maps, Philippine imprints and many others.  It gives visitors the chance to think of how far we have come as a nation.  Indeed, you would see how strongly connected our history and culture are. It makes me hope for a better, progressive tomorrow for all of us Filipinos.

The exhibit runs from Feb 6 to May 30, 2015.  The Lopez Memorial Museum is open to all students, art lovers, Filipiniana scholars and researchers who wish to discover their heritage and maintain pride in being Filipino. Location is at the  ground floor of the Benpres Building, Exchange Road corner Meralco Avanue, Pasig City. Museum and Library hours are 8:00 am to 5:00 pm, Mondays to Saturdays.

Propaganda exhibition poster

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